Brandon Vogt

How to Easily Read the Whole Bible in 2017

bible

As you prepare for the new year, why not commit to reading the entire Bible in 2017? It’s not as hard as you might think.

The Bible contains around 775,000 words. The average adult reads 250 words per minute. That means if you read the Bible for just 10 minutes per day, you’ll get through the whole thing in a year!

Everyone can find 10 minutes in their day, whether early in the morning, during a lunch break, or before going to bed.

But after committing to reading the whole Bible, most people have two questions: which translation should I use, and how should I do it?

Which Translation to Use?

There are a few things to keep in mind with translations. First, make sure your Bible is complete. Protestant translations such as the New International Version (NIV), the English Standard Version (ESV), and the King James Version (KJV) do not contain the seven deuterocanonical books that the Catholic Church accepts as Sacred Scripture. You’re going to want those books in your Bible (they’re really good!) so get a Catholic Church-approved translation.

Second, you want to make sure your Bible translation strikes a good balance between precision and readability. Avoid paraphrase translations, such as The Message. Instead, go with a more literal (i.e., “word for word”) translation that is still easy to read. Here are my personal recommendations, in order of preference. All of them have been officially approved by the Catholic Church for personal study:

  1. Revised Standard Version – 2nd Catholic Edition (RSV-2CE) – This is the one I use, and it’s hailed by most Catholic Bible scholars I know. It offers a literal but still very readable translation.
  2. New American Bible – Revised Edition (NAB-RE) – This is the translation used during the Mass, although it does contain some questionably translated passages and some dubious footnotes. But if you want to sync your reading to the liturgy, this is your best choice.
  3. New Revised Standard Version (NRSV) – Solid translation although it contains gender inclusive language, changing “brothers” to either “friends” or “brothers and sisters.”
  4. Douay-Rheims Version (DR) – This was the standard Bible for English-speaking Catholics from 1609 until the twentieth century. It’s a trusted version but some readers find it a bit turgid, similar to the King James Version.

You might also check out study Bibles that are specifically designed for a one-year reading plan. For instance, there’s the My Daily Catholic Bible (NAB) which divides all of Scripture into 365 segments, one for each day of the year. It features two small readings for each day, one from the Old Testament and one from the New Testament, along with an insightful quote from a saint. The best part is that the readings are all grouped together sequentially so you don’t have to flip back and forth each day between the Old and New Testaments.

There’s also the Catholic One Year Bible which uses the Catholic Living Bible translation, a less-then-literal translation but one that many readers find breezier and more accessible.

In the end, what matters most is that you find a translation you’ll actually read. If you pick one that is cumbersome or inaccessible, then it doesn’t really matter whether it’s accurate. Your best bet is to sample a few translations online and then choose one you feel most comfortable reading each day.

What’s the Best Plan?

Similar to the translation question, the answer here is whichever plan you’ll follow. Unfortunately, many people figure they’ll just start with Genesis and plow right on through to Revelation. That’s a bad idea. As anyone who has tried this knows, some of the early Old Testament books are meticulous, such as Leviticus and Numbers, and most people get bogged down, wiping out before finishing even half the Old Testament.

What’s a better strategy? Follow a carefully designed reading plan that will serve you the right parts of Scripture, at the right pace and the right time. Some of these plans alternate between Old and New Testament readings, while some also intersperse the Psalms throughout the year to add variation.

Here are some of my favorite Bible reading plans for Catholics. Choose your Bible translation, then choose a plan, and you’ll be ready to make 2017 the year you finally finish the whole Bible:

Read the Bible and the Catechism in a Year – This plan, created by the Coming Home Network, is perhaps my favorite. Not only does it take you through the whole Bible (the Catholic Bible, including the deuterocanonical books), but it also gets you through the entire Catechism of the Catholic Church. Each day you read about three chapters of Scripture and fifteen paragraphs of the Catechism. It will take about 30 minutes each day, but then at the end of the year, you will have finished the Bible and the Catechism—you’ll know more about your faith than 99% of fellow Catholics. (Note: To get the PDF of this plan, you have to create a free account on the CHNetwork’s website, but it’s definitely worth it.)

Dr. Mary Healy’s Read the Bible in a Year Plan – This plan was created by Dr. Mary Healy, a premier Catholic biblical scholar, and it’s great because it has you reading excerpts from the Old Testament, Psalms, and New Testament each day. That means when you get to the difficult Old Testament sections, you’ll still have the Psalms and New Testament to balance you out.

CatholicBibleInAYear.org Reading Plan – This one is similar to Dr. Healy’s plan except it offers even more variety each day. You’ll read two Old Testament readings, one New Testament reading, and one psalm each day.

Pierced Hands Reading Plan – My friend Meg Hunter-Kilmer created this plan. As Meg explains, “This one still gets you through the whole Bible in a year (and the Gospels twice), but it goes chronologically through the Old Testament (more or less) with New Testament books and fun books like Ruth and Jonah interspersed throughout to mix things up. It also gives you a chapter of some poetic stuff every day instead of dragging you through Proverbs for 200+ days. This schedule is more user-friendly, more reasonable for those who haven’t read the Bible before, and can start any day of the year.” (Meg also has a really cool Bible timeline PDF that she recommends you print and keep tucked in your Bible.)

My Personal Solution

I mentioned above that I prefer the Revised Standard Version – 2nd Catholic Edition (RSV-2CE) for Scripture study. But I also have a secret weapon: the Verbum Bible software.

I’ve written before about how amazing this is, calling it the most powerful Bible resource ever available. But Verbum also makes it super easy to read the Bible in a year. It does so with a built-in reading plan, right out of the box:

365-Day_Connect_the_Testaments_Plan

The best part about using Verbum is that the reading plan syncs across all of your devices. So you can read the daily Bible passages on your computer, tablet, phone, or any other mobile device. It’s great for people like me who are constantly on the go and often forget to carry around a print version of the Bible. (Verbum also syncs your highlights and notes across all devices, so the reading experience is seamless.)

To be up front, though, the Verbum library packages can be pretty expensive—the cheapest base package is $265.

But if you’re just interested in reading the Bible, the Catechism, and basic Church documents, check out the Verbum Catechism of the Catholic Church Collection. It’s only $50 and gives you lifetime access to the powerful Verbum software along with the Revised Standard Version – Catholic Edition (RSV-CE) of the Bible, the Catechism of the Catholic Church, the lectionary (the readings used at Mass), the documents of Vatican II and the Council of Trent, and a few other resources. All of those documents can be accessed on the go, on any device you’re using. In my opinion, the cost of this collection ($50) is more than worth it if it enables you to finish the Bible in a year.

(I should note that the Catechism of the Catholic Church Collection does not come with all the features of the Verbum software. It lets you read the Catechism and Bible, create reading plans, notes, highlights, and a few other things. But if you want the complete set of powerful tools in Verbum, check out one of their library packages. With those you get the full power of the software along with tons of additional books, which really showcase the power of Verbum. I personally use Verbum Master and love tools like Clause Search and Bible Facts. If you use the code BVOGT at checkout, you’ll get 10% off any Verbum library—just not the Catechism collection.

Also, full disclosure, I get a small commission if you purchase one of the Verbum libraries, but nothing if you purchase the Catechism collection. Nevertheless, I still promote the Catechism collection because I think it’s a fantastic deal and the best way to get started with Verbum.)

So those are my tips and advice. Now a question:

Are you going to read the whole Bible in 2017?

Let us know in the comment box!

  • concerned614

    I always find it interesting that the version of the bible that is approved for Mass is the one people always kind of steer others away from. I love the NAB. I prefer the RSV-2CE for most reading. I like reading the same one I’m going to hear at Mass though, so often I end up reading the NAB instead.

  • Victoria Storey

    I am going to try.

  • Jennifer

    I want to read the Bible in a year. I need a king’s James study Bible with the outline to read the Bible.

  • Jason Hall

    Just one point of clarification. The NRSV does use extensive horizontal gender inclusive language (“brothers and sisters” instead of “brothers”) but does NOT use vertical inclusive language in relation to God. Masculine pronouns in reference to God are used regularly throughout. The idea that the NRSV uses vertical inclusive language is commonly stated on the Internet, but it’s completely inaccurate. I’m not sure where that got started, unless it’s just criticism of the NRSV’s horizontal language that got blown out of proportion.

  • Sue Korlan

    I personally prefer the Jerusalem Bible, especially for the footnotes. You should check it out. And I’ve been told Tolkien did its translation of Job.

  • Mike

    Yes, I do this every year. Maybe this year I will read more than one translation…

  • cecilia

    Yes

  • LizEst

    Hi Brandon,

    Please be sure to read about Vicki Burbach’s new book on spiritual reading, which includes the Bible and the Catechism, coming out in January, here: http://www.spiritualdirection.com/2016/12/20/how-to-read-your-way-to-heaven

    Thanks…God reward you and God bless you and your family this Christmas season, during the new year 2017 and always.

  • Lee

    The Catholic Bytes podcast team is going to post audio of the entire Catholic Bible in 365 segments in 2017, check it out: http://catholicbytespodcast.com/podcast/catholic-bible-in-a-year/

    • Be sure you get approval from the USCCB! Many similar podcasts have been shut down.

  • John King

    I did the CHN plan with the Knox Bible in 2016 (3 readings left – leap year!). I skipped the Catechism. In 2017 I am doing the same plan again with the Jerusalem Bible with notes and including the Catechism this time.

    By the way, let me put in a plug for the St. Paul’s pocket edition of the Catechism. It’s vinyl covered, contains all the indices and appendices, and is actually pocket sized. It’s amazing. But it’s only published in Australia, which boggles my mind. I learned about it from a priest of the Archdiocese of San Francisco, who told me that Cdl. Levada gave them to all his priests, because he loved it so much – and he worked on the Catechism! We need to start a movement to get this book in the US.

  • Vivas

    And you can start with the New Testament (RSV!) in your pocket …take it everywhere:

    https://scepterpublishers.org/collections/bibles-and-missals/products/pocket-new-testament

  • Mark M.

    I started to follow the Verbum plan, and realized two days into it that it doesn’t follow the “Catholic” bible. All the books of the Bible that the protestants took out are missing from this plan (i.e., no Maccabees, etc.).

    • True, but in Verbum you can add them into your reading separately since Verbum itself contains the deuterocanonical books.

  • Christmas blessings all! I have been using Verbum for years now, and it is hands-down the very best Bible study software out there today. The only complaint i might have is that is a bit pricey to purchase the libraries, BUT the number of resources that come with them make them WAY cheaper than purchasing hard copies. And I LOVE it that I can take my entire library with me on my iPad Pro and have access to it whenever and wherever I am. Verbum is NOT just a book reader by any stretch, though; it is a fully featured Bible study suite that has so much to offer that it takes a bit of time to explore.

    I am wrapping up my third iteration of reading the Bible in a year; the first year was the NABRE, the second was the RSV2CE, and the current year is the NJB. For the new year, I will do the NRSVCE. I could never have been able to do this without Verbum!

    One note: the 365-day Connect-the-Testaments reading plan still does not include the aprocyphal (Catholic) books.

    • Good point! However, you can add them into your reading separately since Verbum itself contains the deuterocanonical books.

  • Iulia C

    Got ahead of myself and am just about to finish this plan : https://readthecatholicbibleinayear.wordpress.com . Thank YOU so much for your challenge. I have been meaning to do this for years but your email was the decisive push. Best New Year’S resolution I Ever made, and first one I have kept.

    I plan on doing it again in 2017 but I definitely want something more chronological. I need to have a sense of what I read and where I read it, I got pretty lost after the first 10 weeks with the 3 different readings/day. I also really missed on the continuity. I know you said the worst plan is reading it beginning to end, but I will still give it a try 🙂

  • 1aquagirl

    Thank you for your insight! I have been searching for a Catholic bible that I can also art journal in as a way of expressing my feelings for the word. Unfortunately, I haven’t been able to find a Catholic version that allows for comments (i.e. a single column page with space on the side. Any suggestions? I think this would help me remember the word.

  • I started with the CHR and then bumped into “My Daily Catholic Bible: 20-Minute Daily Readings”, edited by Paul Thigpen. This is a reader’s format of the NABRE and includes a quote from a saint for each day. There are two readings – longer OT and shorter NT. The chapters are by date. In addition to paperback, you can get it in electronic format for Nook or Kindle.

  • I started with the CHR and then bumped into “My Daily Catholic Bible: 20-Minute Daily Readings”, edited by Paul Thigpen. This is a reader’s format of the NABRE and includes a quote from a saint for each day. There are two readings – longer OT and shorter NT. The chapters are by date. In addition to paperback, you can get it in electronic format for Nook or Kindle.

  • Tom B

    Did the offer expire?? Went to buy Verbum, but it doesn’t show a discount…

  • Bob Webster

    I’ve been wanting to read the Catechism for a while and reading the entire Bible was on my mind as a 2016 resolution. It is January 6 and I came across this post and now resolved to do it through the CHNetwork. Thanks for the great information and insight.

  • Barry Owens

    Excellent article. I personally use the NABRE for its ease of use in reading although I plan to use the Verbum Basic software, that I just started using within the last week to ten days, to sync to the Douay-Rhimes and the RSV-2CE so I can get a more balanced view of the scriptures, I love that Verbum allows you to sync all of your Bibles and commentaries together so that as you scroll through one book the others scroll right along with you so that you are always on the same passage in every book in every window.

    Right now I going through the 30 Days to the Bible Story reading plan. Next up I will most like do the one you suggested in your article on the 365 Day Connect the Testaments Plan. I used the Coming Home Network plan a couple of years ago and actually ended up finishing the CCC in about 7 months because I just got so involved in it that I kept reading.

  • Thank you for reposting – I’ve been reading the daily liturgy for several years and I know that even after the two year week day cycle and the three year cycle for mass readings, I have not read it end-to-end. This inspires me to accept your challenge! God bless.

  • Thank you for reposting – I’ve been reading the daily liturgy for several years and I know that even after the two year week day cycle and the three year cycle for mass readings, I have not read it end-to-end. This inspires me to accept your challenge! God bless.

    • Brandon – I just finished the Bible, inspired from this post in December, 2015. I used Paul Thigpen’s My Daily Catholic Bible (NABRE) in digital format on my Nook. I started on January 1 2016 and ended tonight, December 30, 2016.

      Your post really helped me believe I could do it so sincere thank you!

  • John King

    I’m reading the entire Knox translation in 2016, with the CHN plan. I think I’ll skip the catechism though. Maybe next year!

  • NonnaBAC

    Thank you! Your article gives me hope that this will be the year I actually read the Bible. Tried so many times. I will try the Pierced Hands schedule because it “mixes it up”. Again thank you and keep up the good work you do.

  • Mike17

    I don’t know about doing it again but I have done it. I set myself to read so many chapters a day till I got to the end. I started at Genesis and ended at Revelation but there are probably better ways of doing it although do these plans actually get you to read the whole Bible? What about all those numbers in Numbers or all those measurements of the ark of the covenant? Are they all included in these plans? How long did it take me? I can’t honestly remember now but I think it was less than a year. But I am retired and have plenty of time for that type of reading. For people still working, especially those with young families it might not be so easy. Maybe for them a year is a bit optimistic, especially if their reading is accompanied by commentary. I think that the main thing is to read the Bible regularly and not get hung up on whether you have read the whole thing or how long it takes you.

  • adam95

    Speaking of the NABRE’s dubious footnotes, I have had JWs try to use the footnotes against the Church’s teachings in our conversations. How am I supposed to explain to them why the NABRE is the bishop’s prefered translation and why the translation can get an imprimatur with these footnotes that I have to reject to uphold orthodoxy?

  • Paul Jones

    Will definitely try…will check out Verbum.

  • Peter C.

    Brandon, thanks for your guidance. Our family is just finishing reading New Testament (after almost 1,5 year – mostly on Sundays but with certain irregularity). Now, we are considering moving to Old Testament. Please suggest any good approach that would not be discouraging for kinds (17 and 18 yrs old), especially when I think about Book of Numbers this might be very challenging.
    God bless you

    Peter C. (Poland)

  • Jack

    I will do my best to read the whole Bible this year.

  • MotherofFive5

    Extremely helpful post. Thank you…

  • Celeste

    Hello Brandon,

    I like your ideas & advice included here. It’s very helpful to cut things into bite size pieces.

    A correction to your notes about NABRE. It is NOT the translation that is used at Mass. We use the second typical edition (c) 1998. It does not contain the revised Psalms or the latest translation of the OT. You mention that the NABRE has some questionable translation & footnotes. That may we why we do not use it at Mass.

    Celeste

    • Hey, Celeste! Perhaps I’m reading this wrong, but I’m pretty sure that the Mass in the U.S. is based on the NAB-RE: http://www.usccb.org/bible/index.cfm

      • Giacomo

        Hi Brandon. I think she means it is NAB but that it is second typical edition as it says at the bottom of the page after you select “Today’s Reading”? Haven’t you noticed Psalms are different? 😉
        I don’t understand why it’s used and also Grail Psalter. I access this link often, though, because it is quick and I can zoom the text. But I lament the footnotes often seem a grave injustice to readers. Thanks for encouraging folks to read Sacred Scripture and recommending the best translation. God bless

  • Timothy Black

    Thanks for putting this up, Brandon. I did the Bible and Catechism plan in a year for 2015. Very very doable. Actually finished a few weeks early, as some days, I would read 2 or 3 or 4 days worth, if I had time.

    But if you don’t get to it everyday, it’s no biggie. Just press on and finish in 14 or 16 months, or whatever is good. I certainly missed days here and there as well, but just pressed on.

  • Timothy Black

    Thanks for putting this up, Brandon. I did the Bible and Catechism plan in a year for 2015. Very very doable. Actually finished a few weeks early, as some days, I would read 2 or 3 or 4 days worth, if I had time.

    But if you don’t get to it everyday, it’s no biggie. Just press on and finish in 14 or 16 months, or whatever is good. I certainly missed days here and there as well, but just pressed on.

  • Philip Mackin

    I love the Catechism collection from Verbum. I’ve had it for a few years. I love Verbum in general and can’t afford anything else from the business, but they have great deals regularly and free resources. This past Advent was great. They gave away the Navarre study of Luke’s Gospel along with other great books. Thanks for the encouraging recommendation Brandon!

  • Philip Mackin

    I love the Catechism collection from Verbum. I’ve had it for a few years. I love Verbum in general and can’t afford anything else from the business, but they have great deals regularly and free resources. This past Advent was great. They gave away the Navarre study of Luke’s Gospel along with other great books. Thanks for the encouraging recommendation Brandon!

  • Nancy Whalen

    Well, I think I will and the Catechism. I will use your plan…the first one.

  • David W

    My plan, which I have used for several years is: Read a chapter of the OT and a chapter of the NT. When I get to the end of the Testament, I go back to the beginning and start over,

  • Ruthann Piepenburg

    I report that I succeeded in following Dr. Mary Healy’s plan of reading a bit of OT history, a bit of wisdom lit, and a bit of the New Testament every day in 2015. It’s December 1 today and I can see that the end is near. I’m so glad I have been able to do this. On those few occasions I fell behind I took two readings per day until I caught up.

  • Ruthann Piepenburg

    I report that I succeeded in following Dr. Mary Healy’s plan of reading a bit of OT history, a bit of wisdom lit, and a bit of the New Testament every day in 2015. It’s December 1 today and I can see that the end is near. I’m so glad I have been able to do this. On those few occasions I fell behind I took two readings per day until I caught up.

  • Victor Melendez

    Sorry, my computer was using spanish. I’m using Dr. Healy’s plan and realized she omits chapters 13 and 14 of the Book of Daniel. Any ideas why?

    • Ruthann Piepenburg

      I don’t know WHY she omitted them but I read them at the same time as I read Chapters 1 and 2. Very interesting.

  • Victor Melendez

    Hi! Using Dr. Healy’s plan. I no ti ceder she omits chapters 13 and 14 of the book of Daniel. Do you know why?

  • frbergida

    Brandon, have you found a good way to integrate CHN’s read the Bible and the Catechism in a year with Verbum’s handiness? The 365 Connect the Testament Plan doesn’t seem as intuitive as CHN.

    Thanks! -Fr. Bergida

  • jaquelineandrews
  • John Mclaughlin

    This really is great information for ensuring that you are able to get the most out of your bible studies. I personally know that I get about a third of the way through and find it hard to get through the rest. Hopefully this will be motivation for all to be able to get through all the bible this year. Thank you for sharing that 10 minutes is enough to get you through the good book.

    http://www.cameronavenuechurch.net/ministries/

  • Beth

    Since I received you email about reading the bible in a year I’ve been going ’round and round’ about it. I’ve tried before and made it some 3 months or so before other things demanded time & frankly I wasn’t making enough time. Last week I sprained one ankle and ‘yanked’ the tendon in the other leg so I am housebound for a couple of months. I have a Catholic study bible I had always used and enjoyed (Good New Bible Catholic Study Edition). I printed out one of the plans you recommended. Looked at both and realized I can’t read a thing as the print is so very very tiny even with my new reading glasses. No income from my end & husband is already working 2 jobs to support us & a daughter that just started college. My question – is there any free online resources that I can use to read the RSV-2CE or another that may or may not be connected to a plan? Or – if I can find $50 to buy the catechism is all of it online including the plan and bible and are they linked so I can go to the plan and click to the chapters/verses for the day? Really want to do this. My husband was not brought up a Catholic, though converted but still reacts as his own mother to illness/injury in that it is a type of vengeance from God for the way ‘you live your life’. Been very rough for me this past week and really want to get back in touch with my core beliefs and faith to get through this recovery

    • Alex Renn

      Beth,
      First of all, yes: If you can find $50, the Bible is included and the plan is free and easy to make and customize (see below). However, the Catechism Collection includes the RSVCE, not the RSV2CE. And yes, the plan allows you to click straight to the chapters/verses for the day.

      If all you need is a Bible, you can simply buy one single book. The RSV2CE is available at link #1 below. This means fewer of the software features will be available to you, but it’s still comparable to any other copy of the Bible you might buy, and gives you the portability of Verbum, and the ability to create a reading plan. You can also still take notes and highlight. Plus, Verbum is totally modular, so you can go back and add books at any time (when you get that tax refund, for example, you could upgrade to the Catechism Collection and everything would work seamlessly.)
      Instructions on creating the reading plan can be found at link #2.
      We also have several other Bible translations, (if you want to find something cheaper, for example, the Douay Rheims is $10.)

      Good luck!

      1. RSV2CE: https://verbum.com/products/29627/the-ignatius-bible-revised-standard-version-second-catholic-edition
      2. http://scripturestudysoftware.com/2012/06/08/create-a-chronological-reading-plan/

      • Beth

        Thank you Alex for the clarification of which bible is included. For now and until I get the money together I am trying to use biblegateway and their bible reading plan. I was able to pick the New Revised Standard Version, Catholic edition. It’s not all, but all I can do right now without giving up basics for life.

  • Roger Merrill

    Yes I have started reading the Bible in a year and also share with a group of men on Thursday night some Bible passages we are starting the book of Acts this week.

  • Steve

    I don’t get into reading the bible through, don’t even have a desire to do so. Rather, I read expanded sections of the readings of the liturgy and then focus on the section where the Lord seems to be leading me by using the Lectio Devina method. What a blessing it is to hear the Lord speaking straight to my heart and how much deeper in love with him it brings me!

  • Peter Rival

    I’ve tried multiple times to read the Bible in a year. Sadly I seem to need a reading plan that is augmented with a cattle prod for when I allow other things to get in the way of my reading. Perhaps an addition to Verbum that won’t release your screen from the reading until you click “Done”. 🙂

  • msheaver

    Brandon, thanks for sharing this. I am somewhat new to Verbum (>2 years) and last August set up a standard (straight through) reading plan to read the NABRE in one year. Following your encouragement, I set up the 365 connect the testament plan for the RSV-2CE, and it is working great. However, I noticed something you might have missed: this plan is based upon the Faithlife Bible, and I discovered that because of that it does not capture the deuterocanonical/apocryphal books of the RSV-2CE. New year’s blessings!

    • Doh! Good point. I should have mentioned that instead of using the out-of-the-box “365-Day Connect” plan, you can just set up your own custom plan using the RSV-2CE and have it last one year. I’m not sure you can mix the OT, Psalms, and NT though, like the other plans above. Hopefully Verbum will roll out something like that soon!

      • Alex Renn

        Brandon, we’ve got the recipe on our blog: http://scripturestudysoftware.com/2012/06/08/create-a-chronological-reading-plan/

        You’re right, though, we should pre-populate these plans. I’ll look into it.

        • msheaver

          Hey Alex, thank you so much for sharing this, big time! I LOVE this better than the connect the testaments, for it seems to me to be a bit startling when I jump from one section to another in the same day. Your storyline approach is just what I needed and thanks again for sharing!

  • Ignacio

    Hello friends, sure! I’m on for the challenge. I prefer the fist plan, “Read the Bible and the Catechism in a Year” because the Catechism brings into perspective many sections of the Bible. I’ll use the NAB-RE Bible version 2012. The reasons are: 1) it’s the version used during the mass;, 2) my teenage kids use the Catholic Youth Bible NAB-RE at home, so it’ll be easier to invite them to read the Bible with me; 3) I find the Catholic Youth Bible easier to read because of it’s excellent commentaries, maps, modern perspectives, tables, etc. Most importante, let’s remember to pray for each other to follow up in our good intention to read the Bible in one year. God bless.

  • Ignacio

    Hello friends, sure! I’m on for the challenge. I prefer the fist plan, “Read the Bible and the Catechism in a Year” because the Catechism brings into perspective many sections of the Bible. I’ll use the NAB-RE Bible version 2012. The reasons are: 1) it’s the version used during the mass;, 2) my teenage kids use the Catholic Youth Bible NAB-RE at home, so it’ll be easier to invite them to read the Bible with me; 3) I find the Catholic Youth Bible easier to read because of it’s excellent commentaries, maps, modern perspectives, tables, etc. Most importante, let’s remember to pray for each other to follow up in our good intention to read the Bible in one year. God bless.

  • Henryjoe

    “Alleluia” Yes.by the Grace and will of Jesus want to read the “Word of God” to Glorify the Almighty and the Living God” The Holy Trinity”

  • C. Goeggel

    Been Wanting to do this for a very long time! Going to do this together with my sons. I look forward to sharing the word with them and learning more together.

  • Amber Vanderpol

    This is so incredibly helpful, thank you! It has been bubbling up in prayer and in various other moments that I should read through the whole Bible again (I did it maybe 5 years ago?) in 2015. Last time I used a abridged (a.k.a. Protestant) Bible reading plan and added in the missing books at the end. I was hoping to find a Catholic reading plan but hadn’t sat down to do the googling yet. Thank you so much for your links, they are such a time saver!! Now to make a decision… (and yes, I know it is January 2nd… but better late than never, right?)

  • Timothy Black

    Very very helpful. Thanks, BV!

  • Cory

    Great post Brandon. I shall try and read the entire bible this year using the resources you mentioned. Happy New Year.

  • Florence Hoving

    Yes, I hope so. Did day 1 today

  • Myles

    Just last night I spent 5 mins reading the Psalm. I have a New American Bible version. This would be one of my New year’s resolution.Hope & pray for the success. A Blessed New Year to everyone!

  • Rita James Rawson

    Happy New Year, Brandon! I accept the challenge and have started today with the first plan you suggested. Will definitely look into the Catechism of the Catholic Church Collection. Thanks for sharing the information.

  • Crystal Then

    I am so happy to see this post! Just wanted to share that I made the resolution to read the Bible within two years in 2014. My resolution was to get familiarized with the Bible by reading a chapter a day and writing a small reflection or questionnaire for it. I began with one of my favorite books, Sirach, and then went on to the Letters of Saint Paul. Later to Revelation and then to the four Gospels. In 2014 I read through the entire new testament and a couple of books from the old testament. This year I plan to finish the old testament. If you are making this your resolution this year, I highly recommend starting with a book that you are familiarized with. In the past, I started with Genesis and it was overwhelming. Hence, when I began to read the Bible in 2014, I decided to take a different route as stated above. Happy reading! <3

  • Michael Walker

    I had just decided to read the Bible this year when I received your e-mail. Smells like the Holy Spirit to me! I like the parallel layout of English and Latin with this Douay-Rheims website: http://www.latinvulgate.com/lv/verse.aspx?t=0&b=1. Happy New Year!

  • dziems

    I just love the idea of reading and more importantly completing the bible in a year. Thank you for your suggestions. I was wondering if you have any additional ideas to help me succeed? I am a mother of 4, and I also am a full time college student. My husband is on permanent disability, so with no paychecks coming in purchasing software is just not possible, could you please offer other suggestions. My faith is my life line during this stressful time in my life; and so I can see where I could benefit from reading God’s word. I have struggled in the past with trying to understand the words and become frustrated and unworthy and then I stop. This year I would love to complete this important time. Thank you so much for your ministry. Dawn Ziems

    • Kiel Gillard

      Dawn, a few thoughts.

      Don’t stress about fitting the bible in a whole year block; it’s more about reading the bible in 365 opportunities. Also, there’s three plans above that don’t require a software purchase.

      Can you read the bible with your kids and/or husband? Or a group in your parish? You are never unworthy to read God’s love letter to you! Don’t worry if you can’t understand the words. The Ethiopian man in the acts of the apostles didn’t know what the words meant either unless someone explained them to him. I would suggest taking note of the things you want to understand better and talk to your pastor about them.

      You have my prayers.

  • Keith

    I don’t think for those who have NEVER read the Bible through before that attempting it is the right first plan. I have found understanding the Bible is better if you know the story and that only requires reading 14 books of the bible. Now I’m not saying reading the entire Bible isn’t a good idea but getting the story down with an accessible translation like the Message or the Good News translation is what I suggest to people. Jeff Cavins has the Great Adventure Bible Study which guides a person through the process.

  • Stuart

    I’ve read through the Bible before in one year, and it is a challenge and can lead to burnout, no matter which plan you use. If you do get burnout and miss some days, don’t get discouraged and quit! Drop it down to a chapter of the Bible a day. Any daily dose of Scripture is good medicine.

  • johndeg

    For the year of faith, I read through the bible chronologically, as well as the Catechism. I think being able to read it chronologically was a big help in keeping the story straight. I don’t remember where I found the plan, but I got it online somewhere!

  • LuAnn Rohr

    Happy New Year, Brandon.
    I actually started reading the bible months ago and was doing pretty well. Leviticus and Numbers were tough and left more questions than answers, really. I would have gotten a lot farther but was convinced to take on a year of teaching religious ed. So, I added that to my 10 hour days of working in an elementary school. I want to try to get back to reading the bible and find your information on reading plans very helpful. Thanks for the heads up. You have great resources but my budget can only afford the free ones. Thanks for the downloads. I appreciate it very much.

  • Chris

    Hi Brandon…I’m all in. Just purchased the Verbum software and I’m ready to begin tomorrow following morning prayer. Happy new year and may God continue to bless the good work you do.

  • richard ruesch

    I am a DR reader, and this year, like past years, I start with the Epistles of Saint Paul, then to the Acts and then Matthew, Mark, Luke and John. if I decide to read parts of the OT. it will be the five books of Moses, comparing it with the Essential Torah (by George Robinson), and then on to the Psalms from #1 to #150 (with the Strophic Structure and Theological Commentary by Samuel Terrien). this usually takes me a full year, sometime slightly less. I also recommend using the Ancient Christian Commentary by Inter Varsity Press, which follows the whole (26 vols,) of the OT and the NT (per the RSV); which is a serious collection of the scriptural comments of the Church Fathers.

  • Jonathan Matricardi

    I listened to the entire Bible verse by verse with commentary last year thanks to Audible.com and Dr. Bill Creasy. Dr. Creasy is Catholic and taught the Bible as literature at UCLA for 30 years. Highly recommended. Audible also has the United States Catholic Catechism for Adults which is amazing. Dr. Creasy’s translation of The Imitation of Christ is also a must. If you have a long commute to work like me, audible books are an invaluable resource for building your faith.

  • Alexis

    I will use Catholic Bible in a Year plan. I’ve tried once before and failed. With God’s help I will be successful.

  • Tom

    Brandon, does the Verbum plan mix Nt and Ot and Psalms in the pleasing way ala Dr. Mary Healy?

  • Kiel Gillard

    Can’t believe copyright issues prevent Verbum selling their products outside of the U.S. and Canada. The Saint of the Gentiles would be rolling in his grave at the stupidity of this.

    • I’m with you, Kiel. It’s not Verbum’s fault though. It goes back to the Vatican’s LEV. I’ve expressed my frustration before: http://brandonvogt.com/free-word/

    • I’m with you, Kiel. It’s not Verbum’s fault though. It goes back to the Vatican’s LEV. I’ve expressed my frustration before: http://brandonvogt.com/free-word/

    • Ceckiz Gzz

      🙁 so that means that even if I wanted it wouldn’t work. The “perks” of living in Bolivia.

    • Alex Renn

      Kiel, Copyright restrictions prevent us from selling the *Catechism* outside the US and Canada, but we can sell nearly everything else. You should call our sales guys and they can help you out. (The Catechism Collection is intended to support the Catechism, hence the name and the sale limitation). Everything else in that collection and our libraries is international.

      Hope that helps!

  • Bad1212

    I used the CHN one 5 years ago and plan on doing it again starting tomorrow.

  • Matt Malicki

    That was my resolution, to read the whole Bible this year and I asked the Lord to show me a plan to do it so your post is an answer to prayer. I’ll probably end up getting that catechism collection version of Verbum – thanks! In the meantime I’ll probably use Healy’s plan.

© 2017 Brandon Vogt

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