“The Church of Mercy” Book Giveaway!

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“Find out how much God has given you and from it take what you need; the remainder is needed by others.” – St. Augustine

 
Since I’ve built up a large collection of extra books and resources, every week I give some away absolutely free, no strings attached.

Each giveaway lasts seven days with a new one beginning every Friday. You can enter any time during the week. Check out my past giveaways here.
 


 
Church of Mercy - Banner

Thanks to the good folks at Loyola Press, today I’m giving away FIVE copies of a magnificent new book by Pope Francis titled The Church of Mercy: A Vision for the Church.
 

The Church of Mercy: A Vision for the Church

by Pope Francis

Loyola Press, 200 pages, paperback
Released on April 25, 2014

The Church of MercyIn the year since he was elected, Pope Francis’s simple message of mercy, service, and renewal has spread to every corner of the world. Through his gentle demeanor, selfless actions, and welcoming call for service to others, Pope Francis has captured the attention of a world longing for an authentic message of hope—we want to hear what he has to say.

Collected from Pope Francis’s speeches, homilies, and papers presented during the first year of his papacy, The Church of Mercy is the first Vatican-authorized book detailing his vision for the Catholic Church. From how to be citizens of the world to answering God’s call for evangelization, Pope Francis’s deep wisdom reminds us that the Church must move beyond its own walls and joyfully bring God’s mercy wherever suffering, division, or injustice exists.

Named TIME Magazine’s 2013 “Person of the Year,” Pope Francis is helping the Church continue toward an authentic Christianity that is faithful to the Gospel and resonant with the world’s greatest needs. The Church of Mercy encourages each of us to ignite the flame within to help share the light of Christ and revitalize the Church.

 


 

I’m using Rafflecopter to help with the giveaway, which is great because it gives you multiple entries for commenting, posting on Facebook, sharing on Twitter, etc. Click below to enter:


(If you’re reading this through email or RSS and don’t see the giveaway widget, click here.)

By entering this giveaway you agree to occasionally receive email updates from me—no spam, just updates about new blog posts, giveaways, and books.


The winner(s) will be randomly selected next Friday and the books will be sent out, free of charge, shortly thereafter.

In the future I’ll be giving away more books and resources, sometimes multiple items per giveaway! So subscribe via feed reader or email to ensure you never miss your chance to win.

(Since I’m covering the shipping costs, only residents within the continental United States are eligible to win.)

How Pope Francis Can Text You

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Pope Francis call

The phone rings and you pick it up: “Hello?”

“Este es Papa Francis.”

“Yeah right, you got to be kidding me.”

“No, en serio. ¡Soy yo!”

What would you say if Pope Francis called you on the phone? It could happen, you know. Since Pope Francis was elected last March, the “cold-call pope” has phoned several people.

After the conclave, he personally called to cancel his newspaper subscription in Argentina. He then called his cobbler to tell him that someone else would be picking up his shoes. In August, Francis phoned an Argentinian woman who had been raped by a police officer. Later that month, Michele Ferri of Pesaro, Italy, answered his phone and was startled to hear, “Hello, Michele, it’s Pope Francis.” And then earlier this month, he phoned a woman in Argentina who was denied Holy Communion because she had divorced and remarried. (It’s still unclear what he actually said during that call.)

So how can you ensure the Pope phones you? Well, the odds are probably against him dialing you personally, but you can get him to send you daily text messages via his Twitter feed.

It takes a few steps to set up, but it’s quick and easy. Here’s how to do it:

 

1. Sign in to Twitter. If you don’t have an account, create a free one here.

 

(Click to enlarge image.)

 

2. Visit the Mobile Settings menu page, enter your phone number (with area code), and then click “Activate phone”.

 
Mobile Sign-Up

(Click to enlarge image.)

 

3. Pick up your phone and text the word GO to the phone number 40404 to complete the activation.

 
Text GO

(Click to enlarge image.)

 

4. Adjust your Mobile Alerts on Twitter. You need to “check” the top option, but I recommend “unchecking” all the rest.

 
Twitter Mobile Settings

(Click to enlarge image.)

 

5. Visit Pope Francis’ Twitter page (@Pontifex). Click the gear icon underneath his image, and then select “Turn on mobile notifications”.

 
Turn on Mobile

(Click to enlarge image.)

 

That’s it! You’ll now begin receiving texts directly from Pope Francis. He usually sends messages about once per day, first thing in the morning, so it shouldn’t overwhelm you. But if you want them to stop, just follow Step 5 above but choose “Turn off mobile notifications.”

Although you may not receive a phone call from Pope Francis anytime soon, you’ve now got the next best thing!
 
 
(HT: Lisa Hendey for the original idea, Steve Skojec for the image)

“Through the Year with Pope Francis” Book Giveaway!

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“Find out how much God has given you and from it take what you need; the remainder is needed by others.” – St. Augustine

Since I’ve built up a large collection of extra books and resources, every week I give some away absolutely free, no strings attached.

Each giveaway lasts seven days with a new one beginning every Friday. You can enter any time during the week. Check out my past giveaways here.


 
PopeFrancis banner

Thanks to Our Sunday Visitor, and in honor of beginning 2014, today I’m giving away FOURTEEN copies of Through the Year with Pope Francis: Daily Reflections. Edited by Kevin Cotter, the book offers rich and thought-provoking reflections from our Holy Father.
 

Through the Year with Pope Francis: Daily Reflections

edited by Kevin Cotter

Our Sunday Visitor, 384 pages, paperback
Released on December 9, 2013

Through the Year with Pope Francis“I want the Church to go out onto the streets, I want us to resist everything worldly, everything static, everything comfortable, everything that might make us closed in on ourselves.”
- Pope Francis, World Youth Day 2013

Pope Francis has been called the “pope of the people” as he captures minds and hearts with his joyful faith, with his warm, direct and loving attention to those he meets, and with his attention to the poor and needy.

Now you can start – or finish – every day encouraged by the same engaging spirit alive in these 365 short meditations written by Pope Francis.

Let his words inspire and challenge you, push you deeper into Scripture, raise your prayer to new heights, or simply fill you with gratitude for God’s personal love for you.

Join Pope Francis and let the flame of faith catch fire within you, as it slowly catches fire across the world.

 


 

I’m using Rafflecopter to help with the giveaway, which is great because it gives you multiple entries for commenting, posting on Facebook, sharing on Twitter, etc. Click below to enter:


(If you’re reading this through email or RSS and don’t see the giveaway widget, click here.)
 


 
The winner(s) will be randomly selected next Friday and the books will be sent out, free of charge, shortly thereafter.

In the future I’ll be giving away more books and resources, sometimes multiple items per giveaway! So subscribe via feed reader or email to ensure you never miss your chance to win.

(Since I’m covering the shipping costs, only residents within the continental United States are eligible to win.)

What the Vatican Changed in “The Joy of the Gospel”

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Evangelii_Gaudium__Apostolic_Exhortation_of_Pope_Francis__2013

Speculation swirled last week when the Vatican mysteriously removed the text of Pope Francis’ groundbreaking exhortation, Evangelii Gaudium (The Joy of the Gospel), from their website. Many theories floated around, from the innocent—maybe the translation needed updating?—to the more radical—was the Holy See redacting certain passages?

As it turns out, the changes were fairly insignificant. Within the last few hours, the Vatican re-published the exhortation online and I used software to compare the old and new versions. There were several changes. For instance, the new version features hyperlinked footnotes and internal links to other Church documents (e.g., when Pope Francis mentions Evangelii Nuntiandi, the text links to Pope Paul VI’s work.) They also adjusted several grammatical errors (e.g., “is” to “are”, “peole” to “people”.)

However, the new document features no substantial changes. Below you’ll find the most significant adjustments (strikethough indicates removals while bold indicates additions):
 
 
Paragraph 5 – “Our Christian joy drinks of the wellspring of his brimming heart.”

Paragraph 9 – “In this sense regard, several sayings of Saint Paul will not surprise us…”

Paragraph 11 – “With this freshness newness he is always able to renew our lives and our communities…”

Paragraph 15 – “Many of these them are quietly seeking God, led by a yearning to see his face…”

Paragraph 28 – “While certainly not the only institution which evangelizes, if it the parish proves capable of self-renewal and constant adaptivity

Paragraph 28 – “This presumes that it really is in contact with the homes and the lives of its people, and does not become a useless structure out of touch with people or a self-absorbed cluster group made up of a chosen few.”

Paragraph 42 – “Some things are understood and appreciated only from the standpoint of this assent, which is a sister to love, beyond the level range of clear reasons and arguments.”

Paragraph 53 – “We have created a disposable “throw away” culture which is now spreading.”

Paragraph 84 – “Fifty years after the Second Vatican Council, while we are distressed by the troubles of our age and far from naive optimism; our greater realism yet the fact that we are more realistic must not mean that we are any less trusting in the Spirit or less generous.”
 
 
So for all those worried about bad translations or the Church adjusting official papal teaching, rest assured! It seems the only reason the Holy See removed the text was to make it easier to read and understand (thanks to the hyperlinked sources) and to update a few minor typos.

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  • "There is only one tragedy in the end, not to have been a saint." - Léon Bloy